Resources

The following are some climate resiliency resources that may be useful for planning in the Thurston Region.
  1. National Resources
  2. Regional and State Resources

U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit
The Climate Resilience Toolkit provides resources and a framework for understanding and addressing the climate issues that impact people and their communities. It includes:

  • Case Studies
  • Background information on specific topics, including: coastal flood risk, ecosystem vulnerability, flood resilience, human health, and water resources
  • Climate explorer – a tool offering interactive visualizations for exploring maps and data (better for state trends than local impacts)
  • Training 

NOAA National Climatic Data Center - Climate Data Online
Climate Data Online (CDO) provides access to NCDC's archive of global historical weather and climate data in addition to station history information. These data include quality controlled daily, monthly, seasonal, and yearly measurements of temperature, precipitation, wind, and degree days as well as radar data and 30-year Climate Normals.

NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information
Includes information on:

  • Climate of the United States
  • Extreme events
  • Regional data 

NOAA DigitalCoast: Office for Coastal Management
Contains a variety of tools including community snapshots of hazard risks, and a climate wizard that contains climate predictions from various models for temperature and precipitation by month (historic and predicted).

National Climate Change Viewer (NCCV) Home
This NASA dataset is provided to assist the science community in conducting studies of climate change impacts at local to regional scales, and to enhance public understanding of possible future climate patterns and climate impacts at the scale of individual neighborhoods and communities.

Map application that contains regional climate change data by county or watershed from a “mean model” or 30 other climate models for two emission scenarios (you can click through and compare different model results).

  • County or watershed level
  • Monthly climate (maximum and minimum air temperature and precipitation) and the water balance (snow water equivalent, runoff, soil water storage and evaporative deficit) going out to 2099 

Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU)
EPA's Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) initiative assists the water sector, which includes drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater utilities, in addressing climate change impacts.

  • Scenario-Based Projected Changes Map (first link under “Tools & Resources”) gives temperature and precipitation estimates for baseline, hot/dry and warm/wet climate forecasts for 2035 and 2060 as well as sea-level rise in 2060 from the CREAT model in half-degree latitude and longitude cells. 


What’s in store for the Thurston Region?

CREAT Model Climate Predictions for the Thurston Region
Source: http://water.epa.gov/infrastructure/watersecurity/climate/index.cfm

 

North Thurston County

South Thurston County

 

Changes in Annual Temperature

Period

Hot/Dry

Central

Warm/Wet

Hot/Dry

Central

Warm/Wet

2035

2.09°F

1.57°F

1.37°F

2.05°F

1.57°F

1.35°F

2060

3.82°F

2.86°F

2.50°F

3.76°F

2.86°F

2.48°F

 

Changes in Annual Precipitation

Period

Hot/Dry

Central

Warm/Wet

Hot/Dry

Central

Warm/Wet

2035

-1.51%

1.74%

6.54%

-2.09%

0.80%

6.39%

2060

-2.76%

3.19%

11.97%

-3.83%

1.47%

11.69%

 

Changes in 100-y Storm Intensity

Period

Hot/Dry

Central

Warm/Wet

Hot/Dry

Central

Warm/Wet

2035

7.68%

7.23%

5.98%

7.79%

5.86%

5.83%

2060

14.03%

13.21%

10.94%

14.27%

10.72%

10.72%

 

Rise in Sea Level by 2060

 

+6.74 to 17.96 inches

The tables above contain three scenarios of projected changes in climate data for the selected location. All data are provided as increases (positive values) or decreases (negative values) relative to a baseline of observed climate at this location from 1970-2000. Each scenario includes projected changes in temperature and precipitation averaged over two 30-year time periods: '2035 period' from 2021-2050 and '2060 period' from 2046-2075.
Specific metrics that are provided here as scenarios include the change in annual average temperature, change in annual total precipitation, change in total precipitation during the 100-year storm event and sea-level rise. Additional data for projected changes in monthly averages and more frequent storm events are available in CREAT.
All climate models project warming, although the extent of warming varies and projections for precipitation vary. The scenarios provide a range of model projections for each grid cell (square) on the map: the 'Hot/Dry' scenario represents the projection with hotter and drier conditions compared to the other model projections, the ‘Central’ scenario falls in the middle of the distribution of projections and the 'Warm/Wet’ scenario is based on a projection with less warming but increased precipitation relative to other models.
Additional information on the selection of scenarios and the sources of data used can be found in the CREAT Methodology Guide. Models used were drawn from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 3 (CMIP3) dataset used to support U.S. Global Change Research Program National Assessments (
http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/).
Latest Update: Current version: 1.0; October 2014

Georgetown Climate Center (Georgetown Law)

The nonpartisan Georgetown Climate Center seeks to advance effective climate, energy, and transportation policies in the United States — policies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and help communities adapt to climate change.

TED Talk - In this 2012 talk presented at TEDGlobal, Vicki Arroyo outlines the case for building resilience: providing examples of actions underway and explaining why the time is now to make changes in how we design and plan our communities with climate change in mind (10 minutes).

Contains an adaptation resource kit for to help communities prepare for climate changes, including sea-level rise and urban heat toolkits.

President’s State, Local, and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience 
Recommendations to the President
Report: The State, Local, and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience (Task Force) was established by Executive Order 136531, Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change, on November 1, 2013. The President charged the Task Force with providing recommendations on how the Federal Government can respond to the needs of communities nationwide that are dealing with the impacts of climate change by removing barriers to resilient investments, modernizing Federal grant and loan programs to better support local efforts, and developing the information and tools they need to prepare, among other measures.

Risky Business - Economic Risks of Climate Change in the United States 
Damages from storms, flooding, and heat waves are already costing local economies billions of dollars—we saw that firsthand in New York City with Hurricane Sandy. With the oceans rising and the climate changing, the Risky Business report details the costs of inaction in ways that are easy to understand in dollars and cents—and impossible to ignore.
— Risky Business Project Co-Chair Michael R. Bloomberg 1

Climate Change Communication Yale Climate Opinions Map
This series of maps shows mapped data on a climate change opinion survey.